A worker uses a blowtorch on an interchange bridge in Englewood, Colo., on Aug. 25. Construction workers for infrastructure projects around the country are in short supply. Seth McConnell/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth McConnell/Denver Post via Getty Images

Agreeing On More Money For Roads, Bridges May Be Easier Than Finding Workers

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Pleasure boats are docked along the Erie Canal in Fairport, N.Y. Some are asking whether the canal is worth subsidizing now that it's no longer a major commercial waterway. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

A Piece Of The Past, A Price In The Present: Paying For The Erie Canal

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Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton delivered competing economic speeches this week. Mary Altaffer and Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer and Chuck Burton/AP

How Did Trump's And Clinton's Economic Policy Speeches Compare?

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Two SEPTA Silverliner V trains, the newest railcars in the SEPTA fleet, wait in a Philadelphia train station in 2014. All Silverliner V cars have been pulled from service for repairs to significant structural problems. Gregory Adams/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregory Adams/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Flint, Mich., resident Jacqueline Pemberton holds her granddaughter at a press conference announcing a lawsuit against government officials in November. Pemberton is one of six plaintiffs claiming that officials violated constitutional rights by providing lead-tainted water to residents. Jake May/mlive.com/Landov hide caption

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Jake May/mlive.com/Landov

Lead Poisoning In Michigan Highlights Aging Water Systems Nationwide

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The 1,300-page transportation bill is designed to free up highway bottlenecks, increase the number of buses and ferries, enhance high-tech information sharing to reduce congestion and fill a lot of potholes. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

A view of greater New York City from the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Reinventing Infrastructure: How Hard Is It?

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People paddle past a flooded house as water that breached dams upstream continues to reach the eastern part of the state on October 8, 2015 in Andrews, S.C. Many dams in the state — and across the country — are in need of repair. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

High-profile events like bridge collapses or road sinkholes (like this one in Maryland in 2010) could make you think America's roads are crumbling. That's not quite true. Logan Mock-Bunting/Getty Images hide caption

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Logan Mock-Bunting/Getty Images

Brazil spent billions renovating and building World Cup stadiums. Almost a year after the tournament ended, the nation is still trying to figure out what to do with them. The Mane Garrincha Stadium in Brasilia, Brazil (shown here in April 2014), was the most expensive of the stadiums — at a cost of $550 million — and is now being used as a bus parking lot. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazil's World Cup Legacy Includes $550M Stadium-Turned-Parking Lot

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Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, and Asian leaders approved an agreement on the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank in Beijing in Oct., 2014. European countries are beginning to sign up too. Takaki Yajima/AP hide caption

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Takaki Yajima/AP

Bertha, The Giant Borer That Broke, May Be Sinking Seattle's Downtown

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Surveyors work below the Interstate 495 bridge over the Christina River near Wilmington, Del., on Tuesday. The bridge was closed at the beginning of the week after officials discovered that eight support columns were tilting. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Divers found a 2-inch-wide crack at the bottom of the fourth spillway pier from the left in this photo of the Wanapum Dam. Grant County Public Utility District hide caption

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Grant County Public Utility District

Saudi women get into a taxi outside a shopping mall in Riyadh in 2012. Plans for a subway system in the Saudi capital are likely to provide the biggest benefits to women and the poor. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

An analyst works at a federal cybersecurity center in Idaho in 2011. Experts say Internet-connected infrastructure is a possible target of cyberwarfare. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

Street Lights, Security Systems And Sewers? They're Hackable, Too

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