Taylor Swift is one of many artists urging Congress to update copyright laws, which they argue don't fairly pay for music available online. Kevin Mazur/WireImage/Getty hide caption

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Why Taylor Swift Is Asking Congress To Update Copyright Laws

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A service technician uses a diagnostic device in front of a diesel engine in a Volkswagen Touran in an auto repair shop in Hanover, Germany. Researchers have been pushing for freedom to learn more about the code inside cars in the fallout of the VW software-rigging scandal. Julian Stratenschulte/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Heath Miller of the Pittsburgh Steelers catches the ball on the 1-yard line against defender Brandon Flowers of the San Diego Chargers during Monday's game in San Diego. Donald Miralle/Getty Images hide caption

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Twitter's Suspension Of Sports Media Revives Debate Over Fair Use

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A Volkswagen Passat is tested for exhaust emissions, at a Ministry of Transport testing station in London. In the U.S., a 1998 copyright law prevents safety researchers from accessing the software that runs cars. John Stillwell/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

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Amid VW Scandal, Critics Want Access To Carmakers' Computer Code

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Comedian Ari Shaffir performs at the 2015 Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in June in Manchester, Tenn. Shaffir has said fellow comedian Carlos Mencia stole his joke about who would build a fence on the U.S.-Mexican border. Copyright on jokes is difficult to prove, and it turned out two other comedians had made similar jokes as well. John Davisson/Invision/AP hide caption

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Picking The Locks: Redefining Copyright Law In The Digital Age

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A law designed to protect copyrights on music and movies put digital locks on all sorts of things. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Why The Library Of Congress Has A Lock On Your Phone

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