Dr. Max Lebow examines the ear of 4-year-old Charlotte Anderson at Reliant Immediate Care in Los Angeles. Charlotte's mom brought her to the urgent care clinic because Charlotte was having balance problems. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR
Can't Get In To See Your Doctor? Many Patients Turn To Urgent Care
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469196691/469462424" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amy Thomson holds 2-month-old Isla in Seattle Children's Hospital in early 2014. When the Thomson family learned Isla's heart was failing, they took an air ambulance from Butte, Mont., to Seattle to get medical care. Courtesy of the Thomson family hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the Thomson family
Lifesaving Flights Can Come With Life-Changing Bills
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460848383/463503928" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former paramedic Kevin Hazzard says he received "zero training" before driving an ambulance for the first time. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto
Paramedic Shares His Wild Ride Treating 'A Thousand Naked Strangers'
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/462020093/462040422" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Eric Bleeker and a partner respond to 911 calls in this vehicle. The medical team can run simple lab tests and prescribe some drugs, which may spare a patient a trip to the ER. Eric Whitney hide caption

toggle caption Eric Whitney
Replacing An Ambulance With A Station Wagon
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/345256876/345997488" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jenny Hackett walks across a street in St. Louis, Mo., on Sunday. Subzero temperatures are predicted there Monday, with bitter cold sweeping east. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jeff Roberson/AP

A Boston police officer wheels an injured boy down Boylston Street as medical workers carry an injured runner after the Boston Marathon bombing in April. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

toggle caption Charles Krupa/AP
Boston Hospitals Share Lessons From Marathon Bombing
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/224049730/224152650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The bite of a cobra can paralyze its victims and, if enough venom is released, fatally stop their breathing. It's estimated that more than 75 percent of patients in India who die from a snake's bite never make it to the hospital. STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images

Keep the soy sauce on your food, and use it in moderation. Aaron Tam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Aaron Tam/AFP/Getty Images

SWAT team members stand guard on the campus of Massachusetts General Hospital following the explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

toggle caption Michael Dwyer/AP

A recent study finds that relatives present during resuscitation attempts suffer fewer psychological effects later. istockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption istockphoto.com