emergency medicine emergency medicine

Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images

While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Getty Images

Drones carrying automated external defibrillators got to the sites of previous cardiac arrest cases faster than ambulances had, according to test runs conducted by Swedish researchers. Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse hide caption

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Andreas Claesson/Courtesy of FlyPulse

Kurt Hinrichs and his wife Alice in 2015, less than a year after Kurt had a stroke. He recovered after doctors removed the clot that was blocking blood from flowing to part of his brain. Courtesy of Kurt Hinrichs hide caption

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Courtesy of Kurt Hinrichs

A Lazarus Patient And The Limits Of A Lifesaving Stroke Procedure

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Hanan Abu Qassem is the first female EMT to staff professional soccer games in Gaza. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

A First In Gaza: A Female Treats Injured Male Soccer Players

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Military medics, medical corps and technicians from every branch of the military attend courses at the Medical Education and Training Campus in San Antonio. Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Wendy Rigby/Texas Public Radio

Lessons From 2 War Zones Make A Difference In Medic Training

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An ambulance pulls out of the emergency entrance at Temple University Hospital in North Philadelphia. Brad Larrison for NewsWorks hide caption

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Brad Larrison for NewsWorks

Will A Study Save Victims Of Violence, Or Gamble With Their Lives?

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Too often, pediatricians say, the teen depression that went undiagnosed in the community shows up in the ER as a suicide attempt. Studio 642/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Studio 642/Blend Images/Getty Images

Amanda McMacken, a registered nurse at Temple University Hospital, shows North Philadelphia residents how to slow bleeding in trauma victims. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

In Philadelphia, Neighbors Learn How To Keep Shooting Victims Alive

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Dr. Max Lebow examines the ear of 4-year-old Charlotte Anderson at Reliant Immediate Care in Los Angeles. Charlotte's mom brought her to the urgent care clinic because Charlotte was having balance problems. Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR hide caption

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Benjamin Brian Morris for NPR

Can't Get In To See Your Doctor? Many Patients Turn To Urgent Care

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Amy Thomson holds 2-month-old Isla in Seattle Children's Hospital in early 2014. When the Thomson family learned Isla's heart was failing, they took an air ambulance from Butte, Mont., to Seattle to get medical care. Courtesy of the Thomson family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Thomson family

Lifesaving Flights Can Come With Life-Changing Bills

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Former paramedic Kevin Hazzard says he received "zero training" before driving an ambulance for the first time. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Paramedic Shares His Wild Ride Treating 'A Thousand Naked Strangers'

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Eric Bleeker and a partner respond to 911 calls in this vehicle. The medical team can run simple lab tests and prescribe some drugs, which may spare a patient a trip to the ER. Eric Whitney hide caption

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Eric Whitney

Replacing An Ambulance With A Station Wagon

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