Alan Oates was exposed to herbicides, such as Agent Orange, while serving in Vietnam in 1968. Decades after returning home, he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and because Congress passed the Agent Orange Act, he's able to receive VA benefits. Courtesy of Alan Oates hide caption

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Can The Agent Orange Act Help Veterans Exposed To Mustard Gas?

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A U.S. Air Force C-123 sprays herbicides on dense jungle beside a South Vietnamese highway on May 18, 1966. This aircraft is the last in a formation of three. Spray from the other two planes can be seen ahead. U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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Air Force Reservists Say Agent Orange Residue Damaged Their Health

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If a plan taking shape is finalized, the MV Cape Ray, managed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, will be turned into a floating chemical weapons disposal plant. U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration hide caption

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Plan Calls For Syria's Chemical Arsenal To Be Destroyed At Sea

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