A biologist holds a slide prepared for testing in a micro array for biological hazards at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, Calif. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ben Margot/AP

U.S. Bioterrorism-Detection Program Is Unreliable, Report Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/457101931/457139772" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A security fence surrounds the main part of the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground, a testing laboratory in the Utah desert. The Army says it mistakenly shipped live anthrax from Dugway to several labs in the U.S. and Korea. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption George Frey/Getty Images

CDC Investigates Live Anthrax Shipments

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/410327135/410340269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza. Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source

Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358122198/358363573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Particles of H5N1 virus — a particularly dangerous type of bird flu that can infect people — attack lung cells. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Feds Tighten Lab Security After Anthrax, Bird Flu Blunders

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/330725773/330760949" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A high-resolution image of the molecular carrier that moves the botulinum toxin from the intestine into the bloodstream. The carrier (silver) creates gaps in the gut lining by grabbing the rope-like molecules (red ribbons) that tether one intestinal cell to the next. Rongsheng Jin, UC Irvine, and Min Dong, Harvard Medical School hide caption

toggle caption Rongsheng Jin, UC Irvine, and Min Dong, Harvard Medical School

U.S. Marine Sgt. Robert Scoggin gets a vaccination against smallpox in 2003 at Camp Pendleton in California — one of the final steps before deployment overseas. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption David McNew/Getty Images

Keep Or Kill Last Lab Stocks Of Smallpox? Time To Decide, Says WHO

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/310475511/311119423" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The anthrax vaccine has been given to more than 1 million adults in the military. But no one knows how well it would work in children. Randy Davey/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Randy Davey/Reuters/Landov

Bioethics Panel Warns Against Anthrax Vaccine Testing On Kids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/174550155/174708572" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript