This prototype built by MIT researchers can be reconfigured to manufacture different types of pharmaceuticals. Courtesy of the Allan Myerson lab hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the Allan Myerson lab

Inventing A Machine That Spits Out Drugs In A Whole New Way

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Sir Harold W. Kroto, a winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, gave a lecture on nanoarchitecture in May 2007, in Brussels. "Find something to do where only your best effort will satisfy you," he advised students. Sebastien Pirlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Listen: Sir Harry Kroto Was More Than A Nobel Prize Winner

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A chemical hearth recently discovered in the walls of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia dates back to its Jeffersonian origins. Dan Addison/University of Virginia Communications hide caption

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Vincent Schaefer, one of the General Electric scientists who worked on Project Cirrus in the 1940s, makes snow in the lab using dry ice. General Electric hide caption

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Dr. Sawen's Magic Nervine Pills contained calcium, iron, copper and potassium. Despite advertising claiming they were free of lead and mercury, both elements were found in the pills. Courtesy of Mark Benvenuto hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Mark Benvenuto