Quid found 228,912 English-language stories in the news and on the blogs about Clinton's health between Sept. 12 and Oct. 12. Quid hide caption

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Quid

Pundits Vs. Machine: Who Did Better At Predicting Campaign Controversies?

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Quid, a data analytics firm, uses proprietary software to search, visualize and analyze text. Quid hide caption

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Quid

Pundits Vs. Machine: Predicting Controversies In The Presidential Race

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Police crime tape marks the scene where a 16-year-old boy was shot and killed and an 18-year-old man was wounded in April in Chicago. The grim milestone of 500 homicides already passed this year in Chicago. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/Getty Images

In Effort To Curb Violence In Chicago, A Professor Mines Social Media

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Words classified according to their gender, as the word embedding sees it. Words below the line are words that (generally) should be gendered, while words above the line are problematic if gendered. Adam Kalai hide caption

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Adam Kalai

The algorithms that serve up what you like can often create closed loops of their own, packed only with people who agree with you already. Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images hide caption

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Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty Images

The Reason Your Feed Became An Echo Chamber — And What To Do About It

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Can Big Data Help Head Off Police Misconduct?

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Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook
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Can Computer Programs Be Racist And Sexist?

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Daniel Craig plays James Bond in the film Casino Royale. Dramatis, a computer program, can detect suspense from this scene and rates it even higher as the plot thickens. MGM/United Artists/Sony/The Kobal Collection hide caption

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MGM/United Artists/Sony/The Kobal Collection

Can You Teach A Computer To 'Feel' Suspense?

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By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

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Now Algorithms Are Deciding Whom To Hire, Based On Voice

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"Timescape" finds words in the news associated with Sept. 11, and weights them according to prominence in a story — not just how often they appear. Gaurav Bradoo hide caption

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Gaurav Bradoo

An Algorithm Is A Curator At The Sept. 11 Museum

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