A child takes a facial recognition test in which he is asked to match the face on the top to one of the faces on the bottom. Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science hide caption

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Jesse Gomez and Kalanit Grill-Spector at the Vision and Perception Neuroscience Lab/Science

Brain Area That Recognizes Faces Gets Busier And Better In Young Adults

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A New York Police Department security camera set up along a street in New York City on Aug. 26. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

It Ain't Me, Babe: Researchers Find Flaws In Police Facial Recognition Technology

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Facebook's Moments app uses facial recognition technology to group photos based on the friends who are in them. Amid privacy concerns in Europe and Canada, the versions launched in those regions excluded the facial recognition feature. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

Researchers found that passport screeners have an error rate of about 15 percent when they're evaluating whether faces match passport photos. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Social media companies like Facebook won't talk about who can access face-tagging data. That silence is a problem, privacy advocates say. iStockPhoto.com hide caption

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iStockPhoto.com

A Look Into Facebook's Potential To Recognize Anybody's Face

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Hey, isn't that ...? New facial recognition software is designed to help store employees recognize celebrities like Mindy Kaling — and other bold-faced names. Chelsea Lauren/Getty Images hide caption

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Chelsea Lauren/Getty Images