This genetically modified yeast can convert sugar into powerful opioid drugs. Scientists working with the modified yeast strains are required to register them with the Drug Enforcement Administration and keep the yeast under lock and key. Courtesy of Christina Smolke/Stanford University hide caption

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Engineers Make Narcotics With Yeast. Is Home-Brewed Heroin Next?

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In the study, muscle cells were injected into the cell-free "scaffolding" of a rat limb, which provided shape and structure onto which regenerated tissue could grow. Bernhard Jank, MD/Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine hide caption

toggle caption Bernhard Jank, MD/Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine

In Massachusetts Lab, Scientists Grow An Artificial Rat Limb

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Families harvest poppy bulbs in the Badakhshan province of Afghanistan. To collect the opium, they score the bulbs and let the milky substance ooze out. The dried residue contains about 10 percent morphine. David Guttenfelder/AP/National Geographic hide caption

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Ikon Images/Corbis

Scientists Urge Temporary Moratorium On Human Genome Edits

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A nurse in 1938 checks the amount of insulin in a needle. For many decades, the only insulin available to people with diabetes came from the pancreases of cattle or pigs. Insulin from animals is still available outside the U.S. — and cheaper than a recombinant DNA version. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.S.?

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The research team used yeast chromosome No. 3 as the model for their biochemical stitchery. Pins and white diamonds in the illustration represent "designer changes" not found in the usual No. 3; yellow stretches represent deletions. Lucy Reading-Ikkanda hide caption

toggle caption Lucy Reading-Ikkanda

Custom Chromo: First Yeast Chromosome Built From Scratch

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This riboflavin-rich material can be used to print intricate, microscopic structures in three dimensions. Courtesy of North Carolina State University hide caption

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A miniature ninja throwing star or a surgical device? The microgripper, shown here coming out of a catheter tube, is activated by body heat. The sharp appendages fold up when the device warms up. Evin Gultepe, Gracias Lab, Johns Hopkins University. hide caption

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Medical geneticist Dr. Harry Ostrer (center) talks to the press outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. The court heard oral arguments on the highly charged question of whether human genes can be patented. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Justices Appear Skeptical Of Patenting Human Genes

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