Emmanuelle Charpentier (left) and Jennifer Doudna have a case for being the inventors of CRISPR-cas9, a transformative tool for gene editing. Miguel Riopa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Miguel Riopa/AFP/Getty Images

Scientists Battle In Court Over Lucrative Patents For Gene-Editing Tool

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/504454201/504467257" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medical geneticist Dr. Harry Ostrer (center) talks to the press outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday. The court heard oral arguments on the highly charged question of whether human genes can be patented. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Justices Appear Skeptical Of Patenting Human Genes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/177369914/177369895" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript