The Liaoning, China's only aircraft carrier, sails during military drills in the Pacific on Dec. 24. Taiwan's defense minister warned on Dec. 27 that enemy threats were growing daily after China's aircraft carrier and a flotilla of other warships passed south of the island in an exercise. On Wednesday, the carrier traveled through the Taiwan Strait. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen, center, is escorted by security staff before departing from Taoyuan airport on Saturday. Tsai Ing-wen left for the United States on her way to Central America, a trip that will be closely watched by Beijing. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After President-elect Donald Trump's conversation with Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen (right), and his subsequent suggestion that the "One China" policy could be reconsidered, a Chinese government spokesman warned that if the policy "is interfered with or damaged, then the healthy development of China-U.S. relations and bilateral cooperation in important areas is out of the question." Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP

A magazine featuring U.S. President-elect Donald Trump is seen at a bookstore in Beijing on Monday. The headline reads, "How will businessman Trump change the world?" Beijing is "seriously concerned" by Trump's suggestion that he could drop Washington's "One China" policy, officials said Monday. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

President-elect Donald Trump spoke last Friday with Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen. In her first public comments, Tsai said Tuesday that observers should not read too much into the conversation. "I do not foresee major policy shifts in the near future," she told Western journalists. Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci, Chiang Ying-ying/AP

Taiwan's President: Phone Call With Trump 'Doesn't Mean A Policy Shift'

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Copies of local Chinese magazines at a news stand in Shanghai on Nov. 14, almost a week after Donald Trump was elected president. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Skyscrapers in the mainland China city of Xiamen are seen in the distance from a beach on Taiwan's Kinmen Island. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

On A Rural Taiwanese Island, Modern China Beckons

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University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Taiwan's Navy Chief of Staff Mei Chia-shu discusses the inadvertent launching of a missile during a news conference in Taipei Friday. Taiwan Ministry of National Defense hide caption

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Taiwan Ministry of National Defense

University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Taiwan's Aborigines Hope A New President Will Bring Better Treatment

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Wang Mao-lin, Taiwan's coast guard commander for the Spratly Islands, speaks next to an image of Taiping Island during a visit by journalists to the island on March 23. The island, claimed by Taiwan, is one of many that are dispute in the South China Sea. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images

Rescue workers used heavy equipment to look for survivors trapped in a building that collapsed in a magnitude-6.4 earthquake in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Blue cans, seen sandwiched between layers of concrete, are visible at the Golden Dragon complex, which collapsed in Saturday's magnitude-6.4 earthquake in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan. Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rescue workers in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan look for survivors in the rubble of a building that collapsed in the 6.4-magnitude earthquake. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

In Earthquake-Rattled Taiwan, A Somber Start To Lunar New Year

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