CSin3 students will wear this green sash when they graduate from Cal State Monterey Bay on Saturday. Krista Almanzan/KAZU hide caption

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'Embodiment Of Grit': How Children Of Farm Workers Became Tech Professionals

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A Face For STEM: Online Effort Targets Assumptions About Women In Tech

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Raymond Wang, 17, of Vancouver, celebrates winning first place at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh, May 15. Courtesy of Kathy Wolfe/Intel hide caption

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By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases. iStockphoto hide caption

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What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

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Computer Engineer Barbie is shown at the New York Toy Fair in New York. Critics took issue this week with a book that portrays Barbie needing help from boys in order to make a video game and fix a virus. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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After Backlash, Computer Engineer Barbie Gets New Set Of Skills

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Cat Or Dog? Sure, you can easily tell the difference. But a machine may not be able to guess on the first try. iStockphoto hide caption

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Deep Learning: Teaching Computers To Tell Things Apart

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Alex Tu, an advanced placement student, takes a computer science class in Midwest City, Okla. There's been a sharp decline in the number of computer science classes offered in U.S. secondary schools. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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A Push To Boost Computer Science Learning, Even At An Early Age

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Harvey Mudd President Maria Klawe often uses her longboard to get around campus and chat with students like senior Xanda Schofield. Wendy Kaufman/NPR hide caption

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How One College Is Closing The Computer Science Gender Gap

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