Farmworker Maria Diaz works in the pepper fields of Dixon, Calif. Julia Mitric/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Julia Mitric/Capital Public Radio

Why California's New Farmworker Overtime Bill May Not Mean Bigger Paychecks

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Cesar Chavez, the head of the United Farm Workers Union, calls for the resignation of Walter Kintz, the first legal counsel for the state Agriculture Labor Relations Board, in Sacramento, Calif., on Sept. 16, 1975. Chavez's efforts in California culminated in landmark legislation that protected the rights of the state's farmworkers and created the ALRB. AP hide caption

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AP

Farmworkers on strike block traffic on the Roma bridge in Roma, Texas, in 1966. Courtesy of AFL-CIO hide caption

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Courtesy of AFL-CIO

Texas Farmworker: 1966 Strike 'Was Like Heading Into War'

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Justino DeLeon, 58, stands in front of his home in Pharr, Texas. A former watermelon picker; he retired from farm work when he fell off a melon truck and hurt his arm. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

In South Texas, Fair Wages Elude Farmworkers, 50 Years After Historic Strike

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Workers sort potatoes in the field, collecting small and large ones in different buckets. Each bucket weighs 30 pounds or so. A worker will shoulder that bucket and dump it into a flatbed truck hundreds of times each day. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Filipino farmworkers, including Larry Itliong (left), were the first to walk out of vineyards, prompting the Delano Grape Strike. They would join forces with Mexican laborers led by Cesar Chavez to form the United Farm Workers. Farmworker Movement Documentation Project/University of California San Diego Library hide caption

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Farmworker Movement Documentation Project/University of California San Diego Library

Grapes Of Wrath: The Forgotten Filipinos Who Led A Farmworker Revolution

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Sarah Ramirez runs an organization that brings excess produce to the hungry. Here, she gleans apples from a front yard. Scott Anger/KQED hide caption

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Scott Anger/KQED

This Stanford Ph.D. Became A Fruit Picker To Feed California's Hungry

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Farmworkers harvest and package cantaloupes near Firebaugh, Calif. Gosia Wozniacka/AP hide caption

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Gosia Wozniacka/AP

American farms like this iceberg lettuce field owned by Duda Farm Fresh Foods outside Salinas, Calif., are facing a dwindling supply of farmworkers from rural Mexico. Kirk Siegler hide caption

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Kirk Siegler

Why An Immigration Deal Won't Solve The Farmworker Shortage

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