Archaeologists have suggested that Stone Age people sometimes ate one another for nutritional reasons. But a new study suggests that from a calorie perspective, hunting and eating other humans wasn't efficient. Publiphoto/Science Source hide caption

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Publiphoto/Science Source

An illustration from 1875 depicts the survivors of the frigate Cospatrick, which caught fire off South Africa's Cape of Good Hope in November 1874. Of more than 470 people on board, just three ultimately survived, and they were reduced to cannibalism. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Cyrtophora citricola, a type of orb-weaving spider, live in big colonies. So males potentially have a large pool of females from which to choose a mate. Buschwerk/Flickr hide caption

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Buschwerk/Flickr

She's A Man-Eater, And That's OK With Male Orb-Weaving Spiders

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The four cuts at the top of this skull "are clear chops to the forehead," says Smithsonian forensic anthropologist Douglas Owsley. Based on forensic evidence, researchers think the blows were made after the person died. Donald E. Hurlbert/Smithsonian hide caption

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Donald E. Hurlbert/Smithsonian

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

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