Siblings Ibrahim and Evan visit the home of their aunt December 27 in Bakhdida, Iraq, southeast of Mosul. The Islamic state burned the home, looted their parents home and destroyed or vandalized every church in Bakhdida. With a population of 50,000, it had been the largest Christian-majority town in the country, but nearly all residents have fled. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Global Powers' Commitment To Intervene In Genocides May Be Waning

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Activists with a group that advocated for recognition of the Armenian genocide react at the German Parliament after lawmakers voted to recognize the Armenian genocide. The posters read, "#RecognitionNow says Thanks!" Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Bosnians Remember When Their City Became 'One Big Concentration Camp'

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A woman weeps as she visits the grave of a family member killed in the 1995 massacre at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on Saturday. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Marko Drobnjakovic/AP

Raphael Lemkin is the Polish lawyer and linguist who coined the term "genocide" — and dedicated his life to making genocide recognized as a crime. Copyright by Arthur Leipzig /Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York hide caption

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Copyright by Arthur Leipzig /Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

The Man Who Coined 'Genocide' Spent His Life Trying To Stop It

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Guatemala's former dictator Efrain Rios Montt arrives in court Jan. 31 in Guatemala City to stand trial on genocide charges. On Monday, his conviction was overturned. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP