A dangerous nuzzle? A man in western Abu Dhabi hugs a camel brought in from Saudi Arabia for beauty contests. Middle East respiratory syndrome circulates in camels across the Arabian Peninsula. Dave Yoder/National Geographic hide caption

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Why MERS Is Likely To Crop Up Outside The Middle East Again

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A medical staff member wearing a protective suit waits to enter an isolation ward for patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in South Korea. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MERS Is A Health Crisis With Political And Economic Costs

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A woman on a street in Seoul checks her cellphone. The government is ramping up efforts to control an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome by monitoring the smartphones of those under quarantine. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Creepy Or Comforting? South Korea Tracks Smartphones To Curb MERS

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Patient one: A businessman brought the Middle East respiratory syndrome to South Korea in early May. Since then, he has likely spread the virus to more than 20 other people. Several of those have passed the virus onto others. Maia Majumder/Health Map hide caption

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Viral Superspreader? How One Man Triggered A Deadly MERS Outbreak

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A student wearing a face mask stands in a public square in Seoul on June 3. More than 200 primary schools shut down as South Korea has struggled to contain an outbreak of the MERS virus. ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MERS In South Korea Is Bad News But It's Not Yet Time To Panic

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Since the first case on May 20, confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, have swelled to at least 30 in South Korea. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Classes Canceled, 1,300 Quarantined In S. Korea's Scramble To Stop MERS

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A South Korean walks through a market in Seoul wearing a mask. South Korean President Park Geun-Hye scolded health officials over their "insufficient" response to an outbreak of the MERS virus. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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South Koreans Mask Up In The Face Of MERS Scare

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In this photo from 2014, passengers walk past the Middle East respiratory syndrome quarantine area at Manila's International Airport in the Phillipines. The virus is now raising public concern in South Korea. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome virus particles cling to the surface of an infected cell. NIAID/Flickr hide caption

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How A Tilt Toward Safety Stopped A Scientist's Virus Research

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A rogues gallery of the viruses (left to right) that cause MERS, SARS, and influenza. Niaid; 3D4Medical; Niaid/Science Source hide caption

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Scientists Fight For Superbug Research As U.S. Pauses Funding

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A farmworker in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, wears a mask to protect against Middle East respiratory syndrome earlier this month. The MERS virus is common in camels. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fearful of catching the MERS virus, workers wear masks during a soccer match on April 22 at King Fahad stadium in Riyadh. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Why The U.S. Is Worried About A Deadly Middle Eastern Virus

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Jockeys take their camels home after racing in Egypt's El Arish desert. The annual race draws competitors from around the Middle East, including Saudi Arabia, where camels carry the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome virus. Nasser Nouri/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Camel jockeys compete at a festival on the outskirts of Saudi Arabia's capital Riyadh, a focal point for the Middle East respiratory syndrome virus. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The source? Signs of the Middle East respiratory syndrome virus have been detected in camels on the Arabian Peninsula. But it's still a mystery how people catch the disease. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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So cute, but not cuddly. The Egyptian tomb bat, Taphozous perforatus, is a likely carrier of the Middle East respiratory syndrome virus, or MERS. Courtesy of Jonathan H. Epstein/EcoHealth Alliance hide caption

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