President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (left) and Prime Minister Binali Yildirim speak at the Turkish Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges Economic Council in Ankara on Feb. 7. Voters will decide in April whether to give Erdogan broad, new powers that would eliminate Yildirim's job. Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Turkey's President Erdogan Pushes For Broader Powers

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Turkish special force police officers stand guard next to a banner picturing the late Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (left) and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as people wave Turkish national flags during a rally this week in Istanbul against the failed July 15 coup. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Video screens Wednesday night in Istanbul's Taksim Square show President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as he announced a three-month state of emergency following last Friday's failed coup. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Turkey Begins 3-Month State Of Emergency Amid Ongoing Crackdown

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Turkey's government accuses U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, pictured in 2014, of inciting the failed coup, which has set off a round of dismissals and detainments. Selahattin Sevi/AP hide caption

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Selahattin Sevi/AP

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (left) and Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu pose for a photograph at the start of a meeting in Ankara, Turkey, on Wednesday. Davutoglu announced Thursday he would resign. Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP hide caption

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Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP

A plainclothes police officer kicks a demonstrator as Turkish anti-riot police disperse supporters in front of the headquarters of the Turkish daily Zaman newspaper in Istanbul on March 5. Turkish authorities seized the headquarters in a midnight raid. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Amid Crackdown In Turkey, Dissatisfaction With President Erdogan Grows

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The scene at one of the protests in Istanbul early Monday. Ahmet Sik /EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Ahmet Sik /EPA /LANDOV

From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Istanbul

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