In Italy and the U.S., restaurants are pledging to use sales of Amatrice's signature dish, spaghetti all' amatriciana, to raise funds for the devastated Italian town. Keith Beaty/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Keith Beaty/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Last June, Milan swiped the record for world's longest pizza with a 1.5-kilometer pie. Naples is not amused — and it's cooking up its vengeance. Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Morin/AFP/Getty Images

With A 2-Km. Pizza, Naples Aims To Deliver A Slice Of History

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/477900548/477900549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Japanese food was once derided, but it's now in the canon of haute cuisine, says author Krishnendu Ray. How we value a culture's cuisine in our society, he says, often reflects the status of those who cook it. Alex Green/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Green/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Michele Vaccaro buries a fig tree in the yard of Mary Menniti in Sewickley, Pa. Hal Klein for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Hal Klein for NPR

Why Bury Fig Trees? A Curious Tradition Preserves A Taste Of Italy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/371184053/373128474" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At 820 calories, Maggiano's tiramisu packs in more than the tiramisu served at Olive Garden (510 calories) or Macaroni Grill (690 calories). But it pales in comparison with the version served at Carrabba's, which has 1,060 calories. Maggiano's hide caption

toggle caption
Maggiano's

Ava Gene's, a Roman-inspired restaurant in Portland, Ore., incorporates colatura, a modern descendant of ancient Roman fish sauce, into several of its dishes. Deena Prichep/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deena Prichep/NPR

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/240237774/240955358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Various types of pancetta, bacon made from pork belly, on display in Turin, Italy. Unlike the American variety, which is smoked, Italian pancetta is cured in salt and spices. Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images