These tiny Proteus digital sensors and a wearable patch keep track of how patients take their prescribed medications. It's one example of the growing field of ingestible medical devices. Proteus Digital Health hide caption

toggle caption Proteus Digital Health

Kroto displays a model of his discovery in 1996: a soccer ball-shape carbon molecule that spawned a new field of study and could act as a tiny cage to transport other chemicals. Michael Scates/AP hide caption

toggle caption Michael Scates/AP

Solar sponge: The top layer of graphite soaks up the sun's energy in tiny holes. When drops of liquid fill the holes, the water quickly evaporates. (The beaker looks hot, but the water below the sponge is cool as a cucumber.) Courtesy of George Ni/MIT hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of George Ni/MIT

Nanoflowers, each smaller than the thickness of a dollar bill, sprout up spontaneously on a surface dipped in salts and silicon. Courtesy of Wim Noorduin/Harvard University hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Wim Noorduin/Harvard University

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