Rows of greens grow on the front yard of Gary Henderson's house. He's one of a handful of homeowners in Orlando, Fla., who've given up their lawn to Fleet Farming. Once "you realize that you can eat your lawn, I think it makes a whole lot of sense," Henderson says. Catherine Welch/WMFE hide caption

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Catherine Welch/WMFE

An All-Volunteer Squad Of Farmers Is Turning Florida Lawns Into Food

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Big Muddy Farms, an urban farm in northern Omaha, Neb., is seen among residential homes last October. Urban farms have become a celebrated trend, yet earning a living at it is tough, a new survey finds. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP