Mynor Sanchez, a resident of Moore, Okla., lives a few blocks away and three houses down from major destruction. He is volunteering Friday in the neighborhood with his church, Templo El Alabanza, trying to do any tasks with which residents need help. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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'Part Of The Community': Latinos Rebuild After Okla. Tornado

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Rita Green carried a plastic bin of items as she helped a family friend salvage things from a home Thursday in Moore, Okla. Lucas Jackson /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Students and teachers from Eastlake Elementary and Plaza Towers Elementary schools gathered Thursday to say goodbye for the summer. This was a chance to reconnect after the devastating tornado brought an abrupt end to the school year at Plaza Towers in Moore, Okla. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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After The Storm: Students Gather For One More School Day

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Players, coaches and parents collected donations Wednesday in Oklahoma city for the Angle Family, who lost their daughter Sydney, and their home, in the tornado. Sydney was No. 35 on a softball team called 'Bring It'. Katie Hayes Luke/Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

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A teddy bear sits atop some of the rubble in Moore, Okla. Rick Wilking /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition': Kirk Siegler reports from Moore, Okla.

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