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Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew /AFP/Getty Images

When Is It 'Terrorism'? How The Media Cover Attacks By Muslim Perpetrators

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In the aftermath of a police-involved shooting, there's often a familiar debate about what led to it. But research shows there's an underlying cause that we often miss. JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images

The 'Thumbprint Of The Culture': Implicit Bias And Police Shootings

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The "broken windows" theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Theory Of Crime And Policing Was Born, And Went Terribly Wrong

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Some People Are Great At Recognizing Faces. Others...Not So Much

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The broken windows theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime as well. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Getty Images/Image Source

How A Theory Of Crime And Policing Was Born, And Went Terribly Wrong

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Nextdoor CEO Nirav Tolia says a pilot project using algorithms to check for racially charged terms has helped cut racial profiling posts by roughly 50 percent. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Social Network Nextdoor Moves To Block Racial Profiling Online

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Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, poses for a photo at the hospital, Monday, July 11, 2016, in Dallas. Williams treated some of the Dallas police officers who were shot Thursday night in downtown Dallas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Treating The Police, Fearing The Police: Dallas Surgeon Brian Williams Reflects

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Kurt Britz checks a driver's license at the 3-D Denver Discrete Dispensary on Jan. 1, 2014, the first day recreational marijuana sales were legal in Colorado. Possession remains illegal for those under 21 years old, and statistics show a widening racial gap in arrests for those offenses. Theo Stroomer/Getty Images hide caption

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As Adults Legally Smoke Pot In Colorado, More Minority Kids Arrested For It

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Khairuldeen Makhzoomi (left) came to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee and says he was recently unfairly removed from a flight. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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Haven Daley/AP

'Flying While Muslim': Profiling Fears After Arabic Speaker Removed From Plane

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Raymond Smith of Charleston, S.C., kneels in prayer in front of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston before a worship service on June 21. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/AP

Coping While Black: A Season Of Traumatic News Takes A Psychological Toll

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Rick Ector trains new gun owners at a range just outside of Detroit. He supports more African-Americans getting permits to carry concealed weapons. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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More African-Americans Support Carrying Legal Guns For Self-Defense

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Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

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