Nextdoor CEO Nirav Tolia says a pilot project using algorithms to check for racially charged terms has helped cut racial profiling posts by roughly 50 percent. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Social Network Nextdoor Moves To Block Racial Profiling Online

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Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon at Parkland Memorial Hospital, poses for a photo at the hospital, Monday, July 11, 2016, in Dallas. Williams treated some of the Dallas police officers who were shot Thursday night in downtown Dallas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Treating The Police, Fearing The Police: Dallas Surgeon Brian Williams Reflects

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Kurt Britz checks a driver's license at the 3-D Denver Discrete Dispensary on Jan. 1, 2014, the first day recreational marijuana sales were legal in Colorado. Possession remains illegal for those under 21 years old, and statistics show a widening racial gap in arrests for those offenses. Theo Stroomer/Getty Images hide caption

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As Adults Legally Smoke Pot In Colorado, More Minority Kids Arrested For It

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Khairuldeen Makhzoomi (left) came to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee and says he was recently unfairly removed from a flight. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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'Flying While Muslim': Profiling Fears After Arabic Speaker Removed From Plane

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Raymond Smith of Charleston, S.C., kneels in prayer in front of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston before a worship service on June 21. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Coping While Black: A Season Of Traumatic News Takes A Psychological Toll

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Rick Ector trains new gun owners at a range just outside of Detroit. He supports more African-Americans getting permits to carry concealed weapons. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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More African-Americans Support Carrying Legal Guns For Self-Defense

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Madison Mayor Paul Soglin addresses a crowd of protesters on Martin Luther King Boulevard in Madison, Wis., during a protest of the shooting death of Tony Robinson. Andy Manis/AP hide caption

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Racial Tension Draws Parallels, But Madison Is No Ferguson

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President Obama responds to a question from NPR's Steve Inskeep on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office. Mito Habe-Evans/NPR hide caption

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Here's Why Obama Said The U.S. Is 'Less Racially Divided'

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Justice Department Moves To Further Rein In Racial Profiling

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A TSA agent checks a bag at a security checkpoint area at Midway International Airport last month. The new federal government guidelines on racial and religious profiling won't apply to the TSA. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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