human evolution human evolution

Arthritis is a joint disease that can cause cartilage destruction and erosion of the bone, as well as tendon inflammation and rupture. Affected areas are highlighted in red in this enhanced X-ray. Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

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Max Planck Institute paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin examines the new finds at Jebel Irhoud, in Morocco. The eye orbits of a crushed human skull more than 300,000 years old are visible just beyond his fingertip. Shannon McPherron/Nature hide caption

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Shannon McPherron/Nature

315,000-Year-Old Fossils From Morocco Could Be Earliest Recorded Homo Sapiens

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Rocky spent his first few years raised by people, and is particularly attuned to human speech and behavior, researchers say. But his remarkable ability to learn and match human pitch and common sounds of speech surprised them. Mark Kaser/Courtesy of Indianapolis Zoo hide caption

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Mark Kaser/Courtesy of Indianapolis Zoo

Orangutan's Vocal Feats Hint At Deeper Roots of Human Speech

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The harmless mite Demodex folliculorum, seen here in an electron microscope image, lives in the follicles of eyelashes. Andrew Syred/Science Source hide caption

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Andrew Syred/Science Source
Sebastian Preuber/Flickr; Daniel Ramirez/Flickr

A sample of Georgian from the UCLA Phonetics Lab

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National Geographic paleoartist John Gurche used fossils from a South African cave to reconstruct the face of Homo naledi, the newest addition to the genus Homo. Photo by Mark Thiessen/National Geographic hide caption

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Photo by Mark Thiessen/National Geographic

South African Cave Yields Strange Bones Of Early Human-Like Species

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A group of British researchers has a hunch that once ancient humans learned to cook, starchy foods like root vegetables or grasses could have given them a calorie bump that fueled the evolution of the human brain. Scott Sherrill-Mix/Flickr hide caption

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Scott Sherrill-Mix/Flickr

Horses, riders and runners crossed three streams in the course of their 22-mile race through the hills of central Wales. The average finish time was the same for both species — four hours. Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear hide caption

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Ryan Kellman and Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear

The Neighs Have It: Horse Outruns Man, But Just Barely

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