Male and female tungara frogs. Among these frogs, the guy with the best call usually wins the gal — except when you throw a third-choice loser into the mix. Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life hide caption

toggle caption Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life

The newly described L. larvaepartus (male, left, and female) from Indonesia's island of Sulawesi. Odd, sure, but at least they don't use their stomachs as breeding chambers, as some other frogs do. Jim McGuire/UC Berkeley hide caption

toggle caption Jim McGuire/UC Berkeley

Science

These Froggies Went A Courtin' And Gave Birth To Live Tadpoles

Who needs eggs? Scientists have discovered an unusual frog species that gives birth to live tadpoles.

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Populations of frogs and other amphibians are declining at an average rate of 3.7 percent each year, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images