favelas favelas

Residents look on as Brazilian military police officers patrol Mare, one of the largest complexes of favelas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on March 30. In one of the world's most violent countries, homicide rates are dropping — but only for whites. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

In Brazil, Race Is A Matter Of Life And Violent Death

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Two young men play street soccer in the Rio de Janeiro shantytown of Vidigal on May 14. Marcelo Sayao/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Marcelo Sayao/EPA/Landov

In Brazil, Pacification Paves Way For Baby Steps To Democracy

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Robert Laurindo recently opened Casa da Tapioca in favela Vidigal, in Rio de Janeiro. He purchased a two-level, one-bedroom building, which includes the cafe on the ground floor. Here, he serves his grandmother's tapioca recipes to Elizangela Ferreiro, right, and her daughter, Jessica da Silva, originally from Sao Paulo, who recently moved to Vidigal. Lianne Milton for NPR hide caption

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Lianne Milton for NPR

Once Unsafe, Rio's Shantytowns See Rapid Gentrification

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