childbirth childbirth

Tricia Olson takes a selfie of herself and her son Augustus, or Gus, who sits in his car seat. Olson took three weeks of unpaid leave from her job at a towing company in Rock Springs, Wyo., after giving birth. Courtesy of Tricia Olson hide caption

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Courtesy of Tricia Olson

On Your Mark, Give Birth, Go Back To Work

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Women go through a lot in the delivery of a healthy baby. But in most cases, doctors say, an episiotomy needn't be part of the experience. Marc Romanelli/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Romanelli/Blend Images/Getty Images

The upshot from a study of more than 75,000 low-risk births is that "childbirth in the United States is very safe regardless of where you decide to do it," says Dr. Michael Greene, who directs obstetrics at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

Giving Birth Outside A Hospital Is A Little Riskier For The Baby

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Should More Women Give Birth Outside The Hospital?

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