U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, shown here at the Pentagon in March, has said the "new breed of warrior" — cyberwarriors — will be expected to fight just as hard as their colleagues on conventional battlefields. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rules For Cyberwarfare Still Unclear, Even As U.S. Engages In It

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A pedestrian walks by an Apple store in New York City on Feb. 23. Protesters demonstrated against the FBI's efforts to require the company to make it easier to unlock the encrypted iPhone used by Syed Rizwan Farook. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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From Reagan's Cyber Plan To Apple Vs. FBI: 'Everything Is Up For Grabs'

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Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden spoke via video conference at the Johns Hopkins University auditorium in Baltimore Feb. 17. Juliet Linderman /AP hide caption

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NSA: Fallout From Snowden Leaks Isn't Over, But Info Is Getting Old

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Russia's Vladimir Putin makes a speech in 2009 after receiving an award in Dresden, Germany, where he served as a KGB officer during the Cold War. Norbert Millauer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Spy Vs. Spies: Why Deciphering Putin Is So Hard For U.S. Intelligence

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FBI Director James Comey is one of the federal officials who has said that the growing use of encryption hurts the ability to track criminals. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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A man using a mobile phone walks past an AT&T store, in June. The New York Times and ProPublica report that the telecom giant helped the NSA spy for decades. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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"I try to lead an examined life," says Anne Neuberger, the NSA's chief risk officer. "I try to lead a life where I'm asking myself that question: Have I earned the gift of existence, in some way?" All her grandparents were Holocaust survivors. Courtesy of National Security Agency hide caption

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At The NSA, A Rising Star's Commitment To Faith — And Public Service

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Under the USA Freedom Act, phone call metadata will remain with private phone carriers but can be subpoenaed by the government. Alex Williamson/Ikon Images/Corbis hide caption

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Phone Carriers Tight-Lipped On How They Will Comply With New Surveillance Law

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