Journalists on board a Moscow-to-Havana flight Monday thought that NSA leaker Edward Snowden would be in that window seat. Instead, the plane left with that spot empty. Maxim Shemetov /Reuters /Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Maxim Shemetov /Reuters /Landov

President Obama glances at Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron (right) during a news conference with European Union officials at the G-8 summit in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland, on Monday. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption WPA Pool/Getty Images

Google, like Facebook, Microsoft and other Internet companies, is concerned that data requests from U.S. surveillance agencies could ultimately damage its reputation in the U.S. and overseas. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

U.S. Army Gen. Keith Alexander, commander of the U.S. Cyber Command, director of the National Security Agency (NSA), testifies during a Senate Appropriations Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, on Wednesday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Google was recently allowed to release general data about national security letters it receives, as seen in this chart. The company is now asking the U.S. government to allow it to publish similar data on national security requests, including those made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Google hide caption

itoggle caption Google