Travelers at Pearson International Airport in Toronto earlier this month. At an unnamed airport, Canada's spy agency tested a program that allowed them to track those who took advantage of free Wi-Fi. Aaron Harris /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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President Obama speaks about the National Security Agency and intelligence agencies surveillance techniques during a speech Friday at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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LISTEN: President Obama's national security address

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On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mara Liasson reports on the politics of the NSA debate

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The NSA can reportedly monitor what's going on with 100,000 computers around the world. Gregorio Borgia /AP hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Carrie Johnson on the hearing about the NSA's surveillance programs

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The National Security Agency headquarters building in Fort Meade, Md. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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NSA Says It Would Welcome Public Advocate At FISA Court

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President Obama walks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Sept. 6, 2013. Relations between the two allies are strained after documents leaked by Edward Snowden, a former National Security Agency contractor, suggested the agency had spied on Merkel and other world leaders. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian. Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras /EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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The National Security Agency building at Fort Meade, Md. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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