Darnell Earley, former emergency manager of Flint, Mich., at a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in March. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Men check pipes on Dec. 17, where Corpus Christi's city-owned water main connects with the asphalt plant where a suspected chemical leak led to a citywide ban on tap water use. The ban was lifted Sunday, Dec. 18. Frank Bajak/AP hide caption

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Frank Bajak/AP

Along Saginaw Street in Flint, Mich. Mark Brush/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Mark Brush/Michigan Radio

Even As Levels Improve, Flint Residents Choose Bottled Water Over Tap

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A government watchdog's report says Flint residents' exposure to lead in city drinking water could have been stopped months earlier by federal regulators. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

When California Gov. Jerry Brown mandated water cutbacks in 2015, many people responded by having the grass taken out of their lawns and replacing it with more drought-friendly landscaping. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

California's Dire Drought Message Wanes, Conservation Levels Drop

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Following the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' recent approval of the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline, a coalition of environmental activists held a rally in New York City's Union Square Park to oppose the project. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Orange sediment laced with heavy metals is visible in the path of water coming out of the Natalie/Occidental Mine in southwestern Colorado. This mine is one of dozens on a proposed Superfund listing pending with the EPA. Several mines in the area have been leaching the tainted water for years — well before the Gold King Mine spill. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

One Year After A Toxic River Spill, No Clear Plan To Clean Up Western Mines

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The blue-green algae is called cyanobacteria. It can release toxins that affect the liver and nervous system. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

'A Government-Sponsored Disaster': Florida Asks For Federal Help With Toxic Algae

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