National Public Radio host, Michel Martin asks a question at the live performance of Martin's show, Going There at Colorado State University Tuesday May 24, 2016. The show was titled, " The Future of Water." V. Richard Haro/Richard Haro Photography hide caption

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Going There: The Future Of Water
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Villagers throw containers into a well to collect their daily supply of potable water after a tanker made its daily delivery in Shahapur, India, on May 13. India is in the midst of a drought. INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Warming World Means Less Water, With Economic Consequences
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President Obama drinks a glass of filtered Flint water during a meeting with federal officials at the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan in Flint, Mich., on Wednesday. Daniel Mears/AP hide caption

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Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he and his wife, Sue, will drink filtered Flint water for the next 30 days to show the people of Flint that it is safe. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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A Madison Water Utility Crew works to dig up and replace a broken water shutoff box in preparation for a larger pipe-lining project. Madison started using copper instead of lead pipes in the late 1920s. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Avoiding A Future Crisis, Madison Removed Lead Water Pipes 15 Years Ago
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Virginia Tech students from professor Marc Edwards' lab and other student volunteers work on a second round of water testing for lead contamination in Elnora Carthan's home in Flint, Mich. Maggie Carolan is working with samples at the table. Logan Wallace/Virginia Tech hide caption

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Flint Residents Tired Of Talk And Tests, Eager For Solution
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Third-graders Ezekiel White (right) and Emanuel Black push a jug of water to the cafeteria at Southwest Baltimore Charter School. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Before Flint, Lead-Contaminated Water Plagued Schools Across U.S.
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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again
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