South Korean President Park Geun-hye is shown during a Nov. 29 televised address. The country's first female leader was impeached on Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

South Korean Lawmakers Vote Overwhelmingly To Impeach President

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South Korean President Park Geun-Hye bows during an address to the nation, at the presidential Blue House in Seoul last month. Park said she is willing to stand down early and would let parliament decide on her fate. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Vote To Impeach South Korea's President Expected This Week

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South Korean President Park Geun-Hye bows during an address to the nation, at the presidential Blue House in Seoul. South Korea's scandal-hit president said Tuesday she was willing leave office before the end of her term and would let parliament decide on her fate. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

South Koreans fill the streets of Seoul's city center Sunday, demanding President Park Geun-Hye step down. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

S. Korean President Named As A Criminal Suspect In Cronyism Scandal

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South Korean prosecutors carry boxes containing potential evidence seized from the office of Samsung Electronics on Tuesday in Seoul, South Korea. Park Dong-joo/Yonhap via AP hide caption

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Park Dong-joo/Yonhap via AP

A South Korean protester carries a placard with images of South Korean President Park Geun-hye and Choi Soon-sil during a rally in downtown Seoul on Wednesday. The placard reads, "Park Geun-hye should step down." South Korean prosecutors requested an arrest warrant for Choi on Wednesday over allegations of influence-peddling and other activities. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Her Job At Risk, S. Korea President Reshuffles Cabinet As Scandal Widens

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Anti-government protesters demonstrate as Choi Soon-sil, a confidante of South Korean President Park Geun-hye, appears at the Seoul Central Prosecutors' Office on Monday. Woohae Cho/Getty Images hide caption

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Woohae Cho/Getty Images

Pressure Mounts On S. Korean President Over Her Spiritual 'Puppetmaster'

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Police use water cannons to block South Korean protesters following a large rally against the government in downtown Seoul on Nov. 14. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images

Civil Rights At Issue In Korea, But Not The Korea You'd Expect

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Hundreds of police officers outside Jogyesa, Seoul's top Buddhist temple, as a deadline passed for a labor leader holed up inside to turn himself in. Haeryun Kang/for NPR hide caption

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Haeryun Kang/for NPR

U.S. and South Korean soldiers of the combined 2nd Infantry Division train at Camp Red Cloud in Uijeongbu, South Korea. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

For South Korea-U.S. Summit, The Big Question Is Still North Korea

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A medical staff member wearing a protective suit waits to enter an isolation ward for patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS, in South Korea. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MERS Is A Health Crisis With Political And Economic Costs

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North Korea apparently doesn't like either of them: President Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye at a news conference in Seoul, South Korea, on Friday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A prayer for the missing and dead: Family members and friends have gathered in the port city of Jindo, South Korea, as the search continues for the scores of passengers still missing after last Wednesday's ferry disaster. At the water's edge, many are offering prayers — including this woman. Issei Kato /Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Issei Kato /Reuters/Landov

Cars drive past barricades on the road linking North Korea's Kaesong Industrial Complex at a military checkpoint in Paju, near the demilitarized zone dividing the two Koreas, on Thursday. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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