Divers around the open-ocean aquaculture cage at the Cape Eleuthera Institute in the Bahamas. These cages are not currently used in the Gulf of Mexico, but represent one type of farming technology that could work in the region. NOAA/with permission from Kelly Martin hide caption

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Gulf Of Mexico Open For Fish-Farming Business
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Yellowtail jack (Seriola lalandi) at HSWRI in San Diego. Courtesy of HSWRI hide caption

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Huge Fish Farm Planned Near San Diego Aims To Fix Seafood Imbalance
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Opponents of Michigan fish farms say there is no room for them in the lakes because of sport fishing and other recreational activities. sfgamchick/Flickr hide caption

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Could Great Lakes Fisheries Be Revived Through Fish Farms?
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Thierry Chopin from the University of New Brunswick examines a raft that holds strings of seaweed. The seaweed grows around pens of farmed salmon and soaks up some of the nutrients that would otherwise pollute the Bay of Fundy. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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How To Clean Up Fish Farms And Raise More Seafood At The Same Time
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