This image released by Open Road Films shows, from left, Melissa Leo as Laura Poitras, Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Edward Snowden, Tom Wilkinson as Ewen MacAskill and Zachary Quinto as Glenn Greenwald, in a scene from "Snowden." Jürgen Olczyk/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jürgen Olczyk/AP

A Former NSA Deputy Director Weighs In On 'Snowden'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494356297/494360285" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Edward Snowden, who is in Moscow, is seen on a giant screen during a live video conference for an interview as part of an Amnesty International event in Paris in December 2014. The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence published a summary report accusing Snowden of causing "tremendous damage to U.S. national security." Charles Platiau/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Platiau/AP

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden spoke via video conference at the Johns Hopkins University auditorium in Baltimore Feb. 17. Juliet Linderman /AP hide caption

toggle caption
Juliet Linderman /AP

NSA: Fallout From Snowden Leaks Isn't Over, But Info Is Getting Old

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470579448/470715941" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden appears live via video during a student organized world affairs conference at the Upper Canada College private high school in Toronto in February. Mark Blinch/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Blinch/Reuters/Landov

A man using a mobile phone walks past an AT&T store, in June. The New York Times and ProPublica report that the telecom giant helped the NSA spy for decades. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

Edward Snowden is shown during a live broadcast from Moscow at the CeBIT in Hanover, Germany, in March. On Friday, Snowden said a federal court ruling against the NSA program that he revealed was "extraordinarily encouraging." Ole Spata/DPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Ole Spata/DPA/Landov

Alan Rusbridger said today that he will step down as editor in chief of the Guardian next summer. Rusbridger oversaw the U.K. newspaper's publication of Edward Snowden's leak of classified material. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP

Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan takes questions after addressing the Council on Foreign Relations on March 11. The CIA has proposed deleting the email of almost all employees after they leave the agency. But some critics are saying a larger portion of the email should be preserved. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The CIA Wants To Delete Old Email; Critics Say 'Not So Fast'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/365474273/365516454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This photo provided by The Guardian in London shows Edward Snowden, who worked as a contract employee at the National Security Agency, in Hong Kong last year. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Big Data Firm Says It Can Link Snowden Data To Changed Terrorist Behavior

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/336958020/337034502" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (center), accompanied by FBI Director Robert Mueller (left) and CIA Director John Brennan, testifies on Capitol Hill on March 12, 2013. When questioned, Clapper said the NSA did not collect data on Americans. He later acknowledged his response was "clearly erroneous." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

The Challenge Of Keeping Tabs On The NSA's Secretive Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/333925796/334276019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Over the last dozen years, whistleblowers at the National Security Agency have had a rough track record, facing FBI raids and lawsuits. NSA/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
NSA/Reuters/Landov

Before Snowden: The Whistleblowers Who Tried To Lift The Veil

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/333741495/333892230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript