Former acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates, who had warned the Trump administration about Michael Flynn's Russia ties, was fired by President Trump in late January over another controversy. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Warner (from left) of Virginia, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, and Republican Chairman Richard Burr of North Carolina listen to testimony during a March 30 hearing in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sen. Mark Warner: No Evidence To Support Trump's Political Snooping Claims

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Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, will take over the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election, at least temporarily. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Former national security adviser Michael Flynn's lawyer says Flynn has offered to testify about Trump campaign contacts with Russia if he gets immunity from prosecution. Flynn is seen at the White House on Feb. 13. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

House Intelligence Committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA) walks to the House floor on Capitol Hill on Friday. Nunes has been challenged by his colleagues about over how he acquired and handled classified information that he didn't share with the rest of the committee. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Devin Nunes, R-Calif., chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks to the media about the investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Friday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ranking committee member Adam Schiff, D-Calif. (left), and Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., prepare to take their seats on Monday at a House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing concerning Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Edward Snowden, who is in Moscow, is seen on a giant screen during a live video conference for an interview as part of an Amnesty International event in Paris in December 2014. The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence published a summary report accusing Snowden of causing "tremendous damage to U.S. national security." Charles Platiau/AP hide caption

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Charles Platiau/AP

Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden in New York's Union Square Park, on Monday. Snowden, who says he worked as a contractor at the National Security Agency and the CIA, gave classified documents to reporters, making public two sweeping U.S. surveillance programs and touching off a national debate on privacy versus security. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP