Senate Intelligence Committee Senate Intelligence Committee

Then-national security adviser Michael Flynn speaks at the White House earlier this year. He has agreed to turn over business documents to senators investigating Russia's meddling with the 2016 elections. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn sitting in the White House in February. The Senate Intelligence Committee announced it has subpoenaed two companies owned by Flynn. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Mark Warner (from left) of Virginia, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, and Republican Chairman Richard Burr of North Carolina listen to testimony during a March 30 hearing in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sen. Mark Warner: No Evidence To Support Trump's Political Snooping Claims

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Former national security adviser Michael Flynn's lawyer says Flynn has offered to testify about Trump campaign contacts with Russia if he gets immunity from prosecution. Flynn is seen at the White House on Feb. 13. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Senate Select Intelligence Committee Chairman Sen. Richard Burr, right, confers with ranking member Sen. Mark Warner, left, during a hearing of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee Thursday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump's son-in-law and top adviser, Jared Kushner, will talk to the Senate Intelligence Committee. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Trump Son-In-Law Jared Kushner To Be Questioned By Senate Intel Panel Over Russia

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President George W. Bush speaks to Vice President Dick Cheney by phone aboard Air Force One after departing Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska on Sept. 11, 2001. Eric Draper /AP hide caption

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Eric Draper /AP

Talking Point Or Proof Of Value: CIA Tactics And The 'Second Wave' Plot

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State Department Feared Torture Report Would Spark Fury. Where Is It?

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Ex-CIA Lawyer Says No One Was Misled On Torture, Abuses Were Reported

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Report Reveals Deeply Misguided Interrogation Tactics, Feinstein Says

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An IKONOS satellite image of a facility near Kabul, Afghanistan, on July 17, 2003, shows what is reportedly the largest CIA covert prison in Afghanistan, code-named the Salt Pit. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

As Torture Report's Release Nears, CIA And Opponents Ready Responses

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Senate intelligence committee chairwoman Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is again defending her report on CIA torture methods, which was set to be released this week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A detainee is escorted in March 2002 by two Army military police at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The detainee was being led to the Joint Interrogation Facility to be interviewed by government investigators. Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein alleged in March that the CIA violated federal law by searching computers used by her staff. On Thursday, the Justice Department declined to bring criminal charges against anyone at the CIA or the Senate panel. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov