Protesters last month vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff (left) moving to appoint her predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — an action that would have shielded him from prosecution. A court blocked him from the post. Rousseff faces the possibility of impeachment while Lula is under investigation for corruption. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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With The Economy Crashing, Brazilians Turn On A Once-Popular President

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Protesters used a sign to vent their anger over President Dilma Rousseff appointing her embattled predecessor, Luis Inacio Lula da Silva, as her chief of staff — a move that shields him from prosecution. Both Lula and Rousseff have been confronted with questions from a massive corruption investigation. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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The Brazilian national flag flutters at the front of the headquarters of the Brazilian state oil giant Petrobras, in Rio de Janeiro. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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People, most of them unemployed, line up March 19 at a popular Itaborai, Brazil, restaurant where they can have lunch for about 30 cents. The Petrobras refinery and processing plant on the outskirts of town has been shut down; tens of thousands are now out of work in the area. Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Huge Scandal At Top Of Petrobras Trickles Down, With Devastating Effect

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Embattled Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (shown here at the 21st International Construction Salon in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Tuesday) was elected four months ago. Her administration has been hit hard by economic problems and a massive corruption scandal at the state oil company, Petrobras. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Drumbeat Grows Louder For Impeachment Of Brazil's Rousseff

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A woman has her fingerprints checked with a new biometric identification machine before voting in Brasilia Sunday. More than 142 million Brazilians went to the polls, ending a dramatic campaign. Evaristo SA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff and FIFA President Sepp Blatter talk prior to Thursday's World Cup match between Brazil and Croatia at Arena de Sao Paulo in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Friedemann Vogel/FIFA via Getty Images hide caption

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Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff attends the first working meeting of the G-20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Thursday. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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A demonstrator is shot by a rubber bullet as anti-riot police officers charge during a protest Thursday against corruption and price hikes in Rio de Janeiro. Christophe Simon /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lourdes Garcia-Navarro Reports For Morning Edition

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