The Frederick Douglass Statue in Emancipation Hall at the U.S. Capitol in 2013. On July 3, the National Archives hosted a reading of Douglass' essay about the Fourth of July. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

For nearly 80 years, this sign misspelled the name of famous abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

In Nashville, Spelling Frederick Douglass' Name Correctly Ends An 80-Year Mystery

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American writer, abolitionist and orator Frederick Douglass edits a journal at his desk, late 1870s. Douglass was acutely conscious of being a literary witness to the inhumane institution of slavery he had escaped as a young man. He made sure to document his life in not one but three autobiographies. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images