Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe announced that his administration would individually restore voting rights to 13,000 felons who have served their time. Last month, the Virginia Supreme Court ruled that McAuliffe lacked the constitutional authority to enfranchise more than 200,000 felons en masse. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe leaves an event at the Alexandria Probation and Parole Office on May 24, 2016 in Alexandria, Virginia. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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In Virginia, A Battle To Give Former Felons The Right To Vote

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Ohio voters at the polls in Cincinnati for the state's primary on March 15. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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Amid Long Voting Lines And Claims Of A 'Rigged System,' Does My Vote Matter?

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Martha Shearer got her voting rights back after serving time for a drug conviction. But her brother, convicted of a similar crime, was not able to get his voting rights restored. Gigi Douban/WBHM hide caption

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In Fight For Ballot Access, 'Moral Turpitude' Becomes A Litmus Test In One State

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Pakistani women queue to cast their ballots last month at a polling station during local government elections in Lahore, one of the country's biggest cities. In other areas, local tradition can prevent women from voting. JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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People wait in line to vote at the Board of Elections early voting site on Oct. 18, 2012, in Wilson, N.C. The U.S. Justice Department and several groups are suing North Carolina over the sweeping election overhaul it passed two years ago. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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N.C. Trial Outcome Could Sway National Voting Rights Measures

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"This is just one more development in the ongoing debate about voter identification, but it is by no means the last word," the ACLU's Dale Ho said. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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