Assane Thiobane, 28, a motorbike taxi driver in Tambacounda, eastern Senegal, is saving up to leave for Europe, where he hopes to earn more money for himself and his family. If you die along the way, he says, that's your destiny. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

In Senegal, They're Dreaming Of Europe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480266872/480335785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nialina Ba holds the only picture she has of her late husband, Bourang Ba (in the white shirt). Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

Why The Villages Are Losing Their Young Men

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474972869/476927409" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Aissatou Sanogo and her late husband, Souleymane Diaby. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

She Told Her Husband She Didn't Want Him To Leave For Europe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475723019/475848938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Windy Farrell is a jazz singer from California. Seyllou/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Seyllou/for NPR

It Don't Mean A Thing If It Ain't Got That Senegalese Swing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469210438/472035983" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

For 50 years, the fast and cheap "car rapide" minibus, painted from stem to stern, has become a national symbol for Senegal. Seyllou/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Seyllou/for NPR

If You Think This Bus Has An Eye On You, You're Right

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/470951358/471194982" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ousmane Ndiaye loves computer models, climate forecasting and babies. Here he holds farmer Mariami Keita's 4-month-old baby girl, Ndeye. Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS) hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS)

Mariama Keita, a farmer in Senegal, uses her cellphone to figure out the best time to harvest her peanut plants. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

This Peanut Farmer Turns To A Cellphone — And Prayer — For A Top Crop

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456194983/458361295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The fruit of the baobab tree can be turned into a creamy juice. GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images

How A Glass Of Juice Inspired A Town To Get Smart On Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455206545/455206546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doudou N'Diaye Rose was a brilliant musician and a brilliant dresser as well, with a custom-made wardrobe of vivid, billowing outfits. Above, wearing Senegal's national colors, he sets the beat at a concert in Dakar on Dec. 10, 2010. Seyllou Diallo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Seyllou Diallo/AFP/Getty Images