Aissatou Sanogo and her late husband, Souleymane Diaby. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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She Told Her Husband She Didn't Want Him To Leave For Europe
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Windy Farrell is a jazz singer from California. Seyllou/for NPR hide caption

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It Don't Mean A Thing If It Ain't Got That Senegalese Swing
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For 50 years, the fast and cheap "car rapide" minibus, painted from stem to stern, has become a national symbol for Senegal. Seyllou/for NPR hide caption

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If You Think This Bus Has An Eye On You, You're Right
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Ousmane Ndiaye loves computer models, climate forecasting and babies. Here he holds farmer Mariami Keita's 4-month-old baby girl, Ndeye. Courtesy of Vanessa Meadu (CCAFS) hide caption

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Mariama Keita, a farmer in Senegal, uses her cellphone to figure out the best time to harvest her peanut plants. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

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This Peanut Farmer Turns To A Cellphone — And Prayer — For A Top Crop
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The fruit of the baobab tree can be turned into a creamy juice. GEORGES GOBET/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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How A Glass Of Juice Inspired A Town To Get Smart On Climate Change
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Doudou N'Diaye Rose was a brilliant musician and a brilliant dresser as well, with a custom-made wardrobe of vivid, billowing outfits. Above, wearing Senegal's national colors, he sets the beat at a concert in Dakar on Dec. 10, 2010. Seyllou Diallo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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"This is the last one," says Yassin Diouf, 40, holding her youngest child. "God help me to stop here." She has given birth 10 times; six of the children have survived. She and her family live in the village of Mereto in Senegal. "Maybe [family planning] is forbidden by Islam, but women are so tired of giving birth. If you have the permission of your husband, I think it's good." Allison Shelley for NPR hide caption

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Magida Safaoui, right, and an assistant plate tomatoes at a Trio Toques event in April. Safaoui helps out the three chefs who run the restaurant. Doreen Akiyo Yomoah for NPR hide caption

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