"Oh, look! There's a donkey in my living room!!!" was the photographer's Instagram caption. Adriana Zehbrauskas/Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2015 hide caption

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The relative of a worker who died in the 2013 Rana Plaza collapse mourns April 24 in front of a monument erected in memory of the victims. Authorities on Monday charged more than 40 people with murder in connection with the building's collapse that killed 1,137 people. A.M. Ahad/AP hide caption

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Two years after the collapse of the factory at Rana Plaza, families of victims gather, holding photos of their lost loved ones. Amy Yee for NPR hide caption

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2 Years After Garment Factory Collapse, Are Workers Any Safer?
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A Bangladeshi woman cries on Aug. 2 at the site of Rana Plaza building collapse near Dhaka, Bangladesh. The building came crashing down in April, the worst tragedy in the history of the global garment industry. A.M. Ahad/AP hide caption

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A Bangladeshi garment worker participates in a protest outside the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Export Association office building in the capital, Dhaka, on July 11. The country's Parliament approved a new law that would allow workers to unionize more freely. A.M. Ahad/AP hide caption

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Garment factory workers come out from a building during a lunch break in Dhaka, Bangladesh, in June. Many Bangladeshi garment factories are considered to be poorly constructed. A.M. Ahad/AP hide caption

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