LGBT LGBT

k.d. lang. Jeri Heiden/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jeri Heiden/Courtesy of the artist

k.d. lang Reflects On 25 Years Of 'Ingénue'

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Dave Mullins (right) sits with his husband, Charlie Craig, in Denver. The owner of a cake shop refused to make a wedding cake for the couple, citing his religious beliefs, and the couple then filed with the state's civil rights commission. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

A heavy police presence guarded supporters of LGBT rights at the gay pride parade in Kiev on Sunday. In previous years, violence has broken out between pride supporters and far-right protesters. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Two gay men, who do not want to be identified for safety reasons, left Chechnya after being kidnapped and beaten there. Gregory (left) says he was held for 12 days in a basement. Arnie (right) says he was disowned by his relatives after he was delivered back to his family unconscious, in a burlap bag. They spoke with NPR at a safe house in Moscow. Natalie Winston/NPR hide caption

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Natalie Winston/NPR

'They Told Me I Wasn't A Human Being': Gay Men Speak Of Brutal Treatment In Chechnya

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The month of June, which is celebrated as gay pride month, has been particularly fraught for one subset of the LGBT community: Trump supporters. In Los Angeles the Pride Parade morphed into a Resist March to stand against the administration's policies. Emma McIntyre/Getty Images hide caption

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Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

In Beirut, an audience listens to testimonies about encounters with the police over homosexuality. The event was part of Beirut Pride week – the city's first. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Alison Meuse/NPR

At Beirut's First Pride Week, A Chance To Celebrate — And Take Stock Of Challenges

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Kim Davis attends President Obama's State of the Union address in January 2016. The clerk for Rowan County, Ky., is being sued for refusing to issue marriage licenses on religious grounds in 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A federal appeals court ruled Tuesday that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court and gay rights advocates. Indiana teacher Kimberly Hively, shown here in 2015, filed a lawsuit alleging that Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend didn't hire her full time because she is a lesbian. Lambda Legal/AP hide caption

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Lambda Legal/AP

The second round of the 2016 NCAA men's basketball tournament at PNC Arena in Raleigh, N.C. The NCAA pulled championship events from the state this year because of the controversial "bathroom bill"; the sporting events will now be returning. Streeter Lecka/Getty Images hide caption

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Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., speaks at a press conference on Capitol Hill on Jan. 31. Waters called for an investigation into Trump administration ties to Russia. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Gender-neutral signs are posted outside public restrooms at the 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Census Bureau says it is not planning to ask about gender identity or sexual orientation in the 2020 Census. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

A gay man with HIV stands in a clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He's been afraid to pick up his medicine because of the government's crackdown on the gay community. Kevin Sief/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Sief/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Bahar fled to Iraq after facing harassment in Iran. "I was hoping so much that I could get my flight to America before the crackdown resumed," he says. "So far, there's no way forward for me, I'm stuck." Courtesy of Papal Ahmadzadeh hide caption

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Courtesy of Papal Ahmadzadeh

Protesters and LGBT activists rally outside Trump International Hotel this month in Washington, D.C. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In Religious Freedom Debate, 2 American Values Clash

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Bjorn Mustard of Chesapeake, Va., (left) says he felt depressed and uncomfortable before coming out as transgender. Brian Hopkins of Mathews County, Va., (right) says he believes transgender teens are confused and he supports rolling back protections for transgender students. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Arkansas state Sen. Bart Hester, defends his bill preventing local governments from passing their own anti-discrimination laws. On Thursday, a Fayetteville law was struck down by the state Supreme Court. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Phoenix residents (left to right) Brendan Mahoney, Jenni Vega and Tony Moya all felt shocked and scared on the night of the recent presidential election. They worry about their rights as LGBT people, but more so, they worry for others more vulnerable than themselves, especially Muslims and people who are in the country illegally. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

LGBT Community Worries Extend Beyond Itself To Other, More Vulnerable People

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Leslye Huff, 66, and Mary Ostendorf, 79, in Cleveland, where they recorded their StoryCorps interview. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Once Unwelcome News, Her Daughter's Outing Opened Door For A New Love

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