To make baby back ribs in an hour, instead of the usual three to four hours, you'll need a pressure cooker. Photo Illustration by Ryan Kellman and Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Do Try This At Home: Hacking Ribs — In The Pressure Cooker

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Watch your back, small Texas cafes. Beef brisket (from left), convenience store taquitos and chicken fajitas are taking over Texas. jeffreyw/Flickr; John Burnett/NPR; jefferyw/Flickr hide caption

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Pitmaster Rodney Scott seasons a roasting hog behind a barbecue restaurant in Birmingham, Ala. Scott has been touring the South with a makeshift barbecue pit to raise money to rebuild his family's cookhouse after it burned down in November. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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When His Pit Burned Down, Southern BBQ Master Took Hogs On Tour

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The Pecan Lodge's combination plate, a meat lover's dream. Wade Goodwyn/NPR hide caption

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Texas Pit Masters Bask In Moment Of Barbecue Glory

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