preventive medicine preventive medicine

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force says the risks of screening for thyroid cancer in people without symptoms outweigh the benefits. kaisersosa67/Getty Images hide caption

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Don't Screen For Thyroid Cancer, Task Force Says

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Fresh Food By Prescription: This Health Care Firm Is Trimming Costs — And Waistlines

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Even if you don't get an annual pelvic exam, every woman age 21 to 65 who has a cervix should get a Pap smear every three to five years, federal health officials advise. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images

Are Routine Pelvic Exams A Must? Evidence Is Lacking, Task Force Says

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Mylan CEO Heather Bresch holds up an EpiPen two-pack while testifying about price increases to the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Sept. 21. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Rethinking Automatic Insurance Coverage For Preventive Health Care

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New drugs like Harvoni effectively cure hepatitis C, but they haven't yet been approved for use in children. Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Fox/Baltimore Sun/TNS via Getty Images

Safe Streets outreach coordinator Dante Barksdale says right after a shooting, the injured almost always talk. "Some of them want revenge, right then and there," he says. "Some of them are afraid. They're thinking about their brother or their homeboy. 'Is my man all right? He was with me!' They're real vulnerable. They got questions." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore Sees Hospitals As Key To Breaking A Cycle Of Violence

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Yolanda Roberson, who directs the Empowerment program, teaches a class at a Boys and Girls Club in the Bronx. The classes are funded by the state of New York. Robert Stolarik/Courtesy of Youth Today hide caption

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Robert Stolarik/Courtesy of Youth Today

Jorje Mendez has lost more than 45 pounds through weightlifting and other lifestyle changes. Trainer Johnny Gonzales, right, helps prediabetic patients at the gym he set up at the Lake County Tribal Health Clinic in California. Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED hide caption

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Farida Jhabvala Romero/KQED