More Washington Drivers Use Pot And Drive; Effect On Safety Disputed
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Leaders of the Alaska Cannabis Club share a joint at their medical marijuana dispensary in Anchorage. On Tuesday, Alaska became the third state in the nation to legalize recreational marijuana use. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Customers browse the pot products at Cannabis City in Seattle. In Washington, the 2012 initiative to legalize pot was sold as a way to decrease expenses for local governments. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Cities Argue For a Bigger Share Of Pot Tax Revenue
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Deuel County Sheriff Adam Hayward shows off a container of confiscated marijuana in Chappell, Neb., in July. Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Nebraska Says Colorado Pot Isn't Staying Across The Border
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Officials in Aspen have put out a brochure on how to use marijuana safely and legally. Marci Krivonen hide caption

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Getting High Safely: Aspen Launches Marijuana Education Campaign
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Nebraska and Oklahoma say Colorado's marijuana law is unconstitutional, in a challenge to the law in the Supreme Court. Earlier this month, visitors from Texas smell marijuana at the Breckenridge Cannabis Club. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Trimmers prepare the marijuana flower, or bud, to make it more appealing to consumers. They use scissors to snip off the leaves and stems. Brett Myers/Youth Radio hide caption

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With Harvest Season, 'Trimmigrants' Flock To California's Pot Capital
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Brooke Gehring, CEO of Patients Choice and Live Green Cannabis, stands in one of her company's grow houses in Denver. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Colorado's Pot Industry Looks To Move Past Stereotypes
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Early results showed more than a 2-1 lead for a measure to make recreational marijuana use legal in Washington, D.C. A sign promoting the initiative is seen on a corner in the Adams Morgan neighborhood Tuesday. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

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Workplace drug testing for marijuana may need updating in light of changing laws, a case before the Colorado Supreme Court suggests. Kai-Huei Yau/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Colorado Case Puts Workplace Drug Policies To The Test
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Outside New York City Hall, a policeman watches a protest against racial disparities in marijuana arrests. The majority of those arrested are black or Latino, even though those groups are not more likely to smoke pot. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brooklyn DA Shifts Stance On Pot, But That Won't Impact NYPD
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