At sign-up events like this one in Los Angeles in 2013, Covered California pledged "affordability" in health insurance as one of its main selling points. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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President Obama and Vice President Biden shake hands after the president spoke in the White House's Rose Garden Thursday about the Supreme Court decision in favor of Obamacare. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Supporters of the Affordable Care Act rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on March 4. The Supreme Court is considering the case of King v. Burwell, which could determine the fate of health care subsidies for millions of people. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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A Tea Party supporter rings a bell in protest of the health care law in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, as Obamacare supporters shout behind her. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Health plans begun under the Affordable Care Act are required to cover FDA-approved contraceptive methods without cost to members. Older plans are exempt from that rule. iStockphoto hide caption

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People protesting against the Affordable Care Act rallied outside the Supreme Court in March, before arguments in the second major challenge to the law. Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Landov

Retired California school teacher Mikkel Lawrence sits with his cat, Max. Lawrence has hepatitis C and has struggled to afford the medicine he needs to treat it. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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More than 80 percent of the people getting federal subsidies to defray the cost of their monthly health insurance premiums have jobs, statistics suggest. And many are middle class. Jen Grantham/iStockphoto hide caption

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Florida state Senate president Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, was applauded by his fellow senators Tuesday, after expressing his disappointment with the Florida House for ending its session three days early, instead of working through the budget clash. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

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