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Poll responses to the question of whether the Senate should pass the American Health Care Act. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Poll: Americans Increasingly Think Their Health Care Will Get Worse

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House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (from left), with Vice President Pence and and Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., on Capitol Hill, noted that the CBO analysis confirms that the House GOP health care bill will cut the deficit. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

People attending Rep. Rod Blum's town hall event in Dubuque, Iowa, this week held up red sheets of paper to show disagreement with what the Republican congressman was saying and green to show they concurred. The GOP health care bill was a major concern of many. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Fact-Checking Republicans' Defense Of The GOP Health Bill

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Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., with moderator Thom Hallock during her town hall meeting at public television station Mountain Lake PBS in Plattsburgh, N.Y. Zach Hirsch/NCPR hide caption

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Zach Hirsch/NCPR

At Town Hall Meeting, Republican Lawmakers Get An Earful Over Health Care

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Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett visits the exhibit floor in Omaha, Neb., Saturday, where company subsidiaries display their products during the annual shareholders meeting. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

The Affordable Care Act took money from the rich to help pay for health insurance for the poor. The repeal bill passed by House Republicans would do the opposite. retrorocket/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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retrorocket/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Seema Verma, the administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, joins Vice President Pence and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price on Capitol Hill to advocate for the GOP health overhaul bill. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Here Is What's In The House-Approved Health Care Bill

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In an emotional monologue, Jimmy Kimmel disclosed his infant son's heart defects and asked Americans to put politics aside when it comes to health care. "There are no teams," he said. "We are the team. ... We need to take care of each other." Jimmy Kimmel Live/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Jimmy Kimmel Live/Screenshot by NPR
Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

As Trump And Congress Flip-Flop On Health Care, Insurers Try To Plan Ahead

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People who lacked health insurance for more than three consecutive months in 2016, or who bought individual insurance and got federal help paying the premiums, will need to do a little work to figure out what, if anything, they owe the IRS. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Tax Day And Health Insurance Under Trump

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The Trump administration is proposing changes to Obamacare that the White House says should stabilize the insurance marketplace. But critics of the proposal see big bumps ahead for consumers. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Members of Congress and their staffs seeking health insurance this year could choose from among 57 gold plans (from four insurers) sold on D.C.'s small business marketplace. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Though they failed to mobilize Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act last month, Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) (right), Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and the White House could still undercut the insurance exchanges, reduce Medicaid benefits and let states limit coverage of birth control or prenatal visits. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images