medical research medical research
Sam Rowe for NPR

Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

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This computer-enhanced barium contrast X-ray shows colon cancer in red. Researchers have been trying to figure out what looks to be a decade-long rise in colon cancer among people younger than 50. Scott Camazine/Science Source hide caption

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Scott Camazine/Science Source

Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In a cluster of glowing human stem cells, one cell divides. The cell membrane is shown in purple, while DNA in the dividing nucleus is blue. The white fibers linking the nucleus are spindles, which aid in cell division. Allen Institute for Cell Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Cell Science
Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Patients Increasingly Influence The Direction Of Medical Research

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Tommy, a repeat patient at the Supportive Place for Observation and Treatment in Boston, says the room has saved lives. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

In Boston's 'Safe Space,' Surprising Insights Into Drug Highs

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Diane, a 4-year-old chimpanzee, relaxes in the trees at the Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La., on Aug. 25, 2014. She is one of many chimps who have been moved here from the New Iberia Research Center in Lafayette, La. Brandon Wade/AP hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP
Jamie Jones/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Journal Editors To Researchers: Show Everyone Your Clinical Data

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Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Is It Safe For Medical Residents To Work 30-Hour Shifts?

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Ronald Davis cares for his 31-year-old son, Whitney Dafoe. Dafoe is seriously ill with ME/CFS. His father, a Stanford University professor, is organizing a study of the disorder. Courtesy of Ashley Davis hide caption

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Courtesy of Ashley Davis

A simulation from the Neitz lab of what colorblindness looks like, with normal color vision on the left and red-green colorblindness on the right. Courtesy of Neitz Laboratory hide caption

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Courtesy of Neitz Laboratory

University And Biotech Firm Team Up On Colorblindness Therapy

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Feces contain digested food residue and a wide variety of microorganisms, mostly bacteria, that are adapted to life in the intestines. The gases the microbes produce could help doctors and scientists track and understand changes related to health. Scimat Scimat/Photo Researchers/Getty Images hide caption

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Scimat Scimat/Photo Researchers/Getty Images

Marder says immunotherapy has side effects but is less tiring than chemotherapy. Claire Eggers/NPR hide caption

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Claire Eggers/NPR

Harnessing The Immune System To Fight Cancer

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You don't want to run into methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria. A potential new antibiotic could help fight this bug. CDC hide caption

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CDC

Scientists Hit Antibiotic Pay Dirt Growing Finicky Bacteria In Lab

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