Marya Gelvosa and Josh Gerritsen run a small farm on Maine's rocky mid-coast, providing their local community with beef, lamb and heritage poultry. They're decades younger than the average American farmer, but they love the lifestyle. "It's very fulfilling work," Gelvosa says. Josh Gerritsen/Donkey Universe Farm hide caption

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A Young Generation Sees Greener Pastures In Agriculture
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Writer Arlo Crawford (left) with his father, Jim Crawford, an elder statesman of the organic farming movement who dropped out of law school in 1972 to grow vegetables. Melanie McLean/Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co. hide caption

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Chris and Sara Guerre are among a growing number of farmers who have made the choice to rent land to farm instead of buy because of increasing property values. Zac Visco for NPR hide caption

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Here's How Young Farmers Looking For Land Are Getting Creative
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Young Farmers Break The Bank Before They Get To The Field
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